Upcoming Events: November 27th, 2015 edition | Évènements courants du 27 novembre, 2015

Current Exhibitions:

Writing Topography: The Marion McCain Exhibition of Contemporary Atlantic Art
September 26, 2015 – January 10, 2016
Curator: Corinna Ghaznavi
Organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery and made possible with the generous support of the McCain Family, the Harrison McCain Foundation, and The McCain Foundation.

Masterworks Now! Celebrating New Acquisitions of Historical, Modern and Contemporary art
September 26 – November 1, 2015
Curator: Jeffrey Spalding, Senior Curator
Organised by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery with the support of the City of Fredericton and the Government of New Brunswick.

THE KINGSTON PRIZE: The sixth national biennial portrait competition
November 14 – January 17
The Kingston Prize is supported by the W. Garfield Weston Foundation.

If you are looking for a particular work or exhibition, please feel free to contact us to find out if it is on display!

Opening hours: Gallery now closed on Mondays

We have moved into our Fall-Spring schedule, and are now closed to the public on Mondays. Our offices remain open Mondays (holidays excepted).

Important construction updates:

Our building project is underway – big things are coming, but small disruptions are necessary.

Learn more about:

After school program: We currently have a few spots open for the current school year, starting in September! More information here, or contact Liliana at 458-0973. ]

Francophone docents: The Gallery has launched a francophone docents program, supported by Manulife. Are you interested in helping us offer tours in French? Read more about it here.

Family Art Classes SECOND & LAST Sunday of each month between 2 – 4 pm Families create wonderful memories and art together during these two hour sessions using a variety of mediums. Instructor Sandy Brewer’s classes are fun and relaxed, open to adults and children ages 5 and up, and all materials are provided.

FREE for members with a Family membership (including Family Curator’s Circle and Family Director’s Circle), $5 per person or $15 for a family of 4.

Part of the C. Elizabeth Baker Learning and Creating Series

Thursday Night Art Classes Happen most Thursdays at 7:00 PM – Contact us for details!

Part of the C. Elizabeth Baker Learning and Creating Series

Art for Tots is offered most Fridays at 10:00 am. These short workshops are weekly but casual (so you won’t miss a crucial part if you miss a week), and are geared for the very young accompanied by a parent.

The only cost is an adult admission (so it’s FREE for members, and $10 per week for non-members).

Materials are included. Please feel free to contact us to confirm that it is happening on a given week.

Part of the C. Elizabeth Baker Learning and Creating Series.

Beaverbrook_Campaign_Logo2012_BILExpositions Courantes :

Créer la topographie: L’Exposition Marion McCain d’art contemporain de la région atlantique
Du 26 septembre 2015 au 10 janvier 2016
Conservatrice : Corinna Ghaznavi,
Organisée par la Galerie d’art Beaverbrook et rendue possible grâce au généreux soutien de la Fondation Harrison McCain, La Fondation McCain, et membres de la famille McCain.

Les Chefs-d’œuvre d’aujourd’hui! Nouvelle acquisition d’œuvres anciennes, modernes et contemporaines
Du 26 septembre, 2015 au 1er novembre, 2015
Conservateur: Jeffrey Spalding, Conservateur principal
Organisée par la Galerie d’art Beaverbrook avec l’appui de la Ville de Fredericton et le Gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick

LE PRIX KINGSTON: Le sixième concours biennale du portrait canadien
du 14 novembre au 17 janvier
Le Prix Kingston est appuyé par la Fondation W. Garfield Weston.

Heures d’ouverture: La Galerie est maintenant fermée les lundis.

Nous avons maintenant commencé notre horaire automne-printemps; la Galerie est maintenant fermée au public les lundis.

Nos bureaux restent ouverts les lundis (avec l’exception des jours fériés).

Mises-à-jour de construction importantes

Notre édifice grandit – des grandes choses arrivent, mais des petites difficultés sont nécessaires. Apprenez-en plus sur :

Programme après-école : Nous avons couramment quelques places dans le programme pour l’année scolaire courante, commençant en septembre! Plus d’infos ici, ou contactez Liliana aujourd’hui au 458-0973.

Guides bénévoles francophones La galerie d’art Beaverbrook cherche des guides bénévoles francophones pour favoriser la vie culturelle dans notre communauté. Si vous aimez l’art et le contact avec le public, vous êtes les bienvenus à partager votre générosité comme bénévoles.

Est-ce que ça vous intéresse? Si oui, suivez ce lien pour plus d’informations.

Les cours d’art des jeudis soirs : Ont lieu la plupart des jeudis soir à 19h. Contactez-nous pour plus d’infos! (Cours offerts en anglais.)

Une partie de la Série apprendre et créer C. Elizabeth Baker

Ateliers artistiques pour toute la famille Ces ateliers sont offerts le deuxième et le dernier dimanche du mois, de 14 h à 16h. Tous les matériaux sont fournis. Ce programme est offert uniquement en anglais.

Les frais sont de 5 $ par personne ou 15 $ pour une famille de quatre personnes.Gratuit pour les membres avec adhésion familiale, y inclus les adhésions Cercle du Conservateur (Famille) et Cercle du Directeur (Famille).

Une partie de la Série apprendre et créer C. Elizabeth Baker

Atelier d’art pour les tout-petits Les vendredis de 10h à 11h Les enfants âgés de 2 à 4 ans et leurs parents sont invités à participer aux jeux artistiques, aux visites de la Galerie, aux activités artistiques pratiques and aux contes. Nous vous demandons de vous inscrire par téléphone au 506.458.2028.

Frais : Aucun coût pour les petits; l’adulte qui accompagne l’enfant paie les frais réguliers d’entrée. GRATUIT pour les membres.

Ce programme est offert uniquement en anglais.

Une partie de la Série apprendre et créer C. Elizabeth Baker.

Recap: Writing Topography interviews

There’s no new interview today, so in case you missed it, here’s an index of all 13 we’ve posted to date!

In their words: Conversations with Writing Topography artists

#01: Richard Davis

#02: Gerald Vaandering

#03: Jennifer Bélanger

#04: Michael McCormack

#05: Kay Burns

#06: Leah Garnett

#07: Anna Torma

#08: Nigel Roe

#09: Sara Roth

#10: Kim Morgan

#11: Amanda Dawn Christie

#12: Philippa Jones

#13: Kim Vose Jones

 

In their words: Conversations with Writing Topography artists — #13: Kim Vose Jones

Over the next several weeks, we will be posting interviews with artists currently featured in the Gallery’s Writing Topography exhibition. These interviews were conducted by Rebecca Goodine, a university student participating in an internship at the Gallery. These interviews present artists talking about themselves and their work in their own words. Interviews were conducted with the artists by email, and have been lightly edited for grammar and flow (occasionally, questions and responses have been removed). At the end of interviews, we’ve included some links to provide a bit more information about a topic or theme from the interview; these links have been chosen by us, and were not provided by the artists.

Kim Vose Jones

KimVoseJones

I enjoy the optics. The way the video reflects and reacts with the sculpture. Although 30 minutes in length, it offers brief glimpses of our landscape. I made a conscious effort to edit out any shots that had a human presence, because I wanted the viewer to be the human element, and to imagine the little homes as holding human presence.

Please tell us a bit about yourself and your artistic practice.

I grew up on a lake in southern Ontario where I spent vast amounts of time exploring the surrounding water and land. I lived in Pakistan, France and the USA until I moved to New Brunswick over ten years ago with my husband and two children.

I completed my undergraduate work at Concordia in Women Studies and Religion, glass blowing training at Alfred University in Upstate New York, and my MFA at Maine College of Art in Portland. Currently I work as a MFA Studio advisor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, adjunct faculty of Fine Arts at St. Thomas University in Fredericton and in Reference Services at the Harriet Irving Library. I work primarily in immersive sculptural installation using materials such as blown glass, salt, fibre, construction materials, sound, and video to create my environments.

How would you describe your work in the exhibition?

The work Entangled Community consists of a sculptural representation of a misshapen globe covered in optic resin tectonic plates which appear to be shifting and breaking down. The inside is hollow except for salt deposits and stalagmites. A tiny paper community of sewn houses entangled and bound together by their threads sit upon the surface. A video projection shoots through the sculpture onto the floor, creating a shadow of the breaking-down community that intermingles with the video. For me the work speaks to the notion that those relationships that sustain can also destroy: politically, environmentally, socially and personally. Yet there is in this an underlying presence of complicated beauty where fragility and strength coexist within the work. In essence, polyvocal.

Can you tell us about the process of creating the work in the exhibition?

I work in installation, so I always create sculptural elements in my studio that have a morph- ability aspect to them so that I can complete the work in the space where it will be displayed. This is very important to my process. I see the space around the work as part of the sculpture so each time something is displayed it will change according to where it lives for that time. I create mini-environments on-site, so all decisions about what will be in the final display are made there. I notice things about the work when it is on location. For this creation, I brought in sea salt and designed a pattern around the sculpture resembling the surge of ocean waves against the shore to increase the vulnerability of the work. There is an unspoken taboo about touching art and I like to play a little with that. I have noticed that people have run their fingers through the salt design on the floor, and their curiosity overcoming this taboo. I find this interesting.

What was the inspiration for this work?

Last summer I was awarded a MECA Alumni AIR [ed.: Artist residency] at the Jenny Compound in Baie Ste. Marie, Nova Scotia. For that residency I was working on a larger installation project for UNB Art Centre entitled Sensorium. The house I was living in was on the ocean and isolated. I would ride around the area on bicycle and talk to the locals in the area. I was struck by the tiny houses along the coast that clung to the edge of the earth and the people who choose to remain there even though they were facing economic crisis and dwindling populations. I began to create the community in miniature using interface paper, and blanket stitching together the walls of each house, leaving the last thread hanging from the house to entangle with the next.

Those little houses became the study for the larger silk house I developed for Sensorium, which I eventually developed into a separate piece for the McCain exhibition. The silk house was a peek inside one house, one complicated relationship. So I was working on them together and they became very connected, the micro and the macro view.

What was the development process like from your initial idea to the finished work?

While I was AIR [ed.: Artist-in-Residency] at Baie Ste Marie I would see these tiny wooden houses gripping the sides of cliffs, and communities once vibrant weathering slowly, but still trying to hang on to a way of life that had sustained them for generations. The very industries that fed also destroyed, and this is a precarious balance. I began to think about this planet with its core dug out, and the communities entangled together for support and necessities. It also points of course to general relationship entanglements.

As another part of my gathering of information I spent two years travelling the roads and towns around the province of New Brunswick. I would be driving through these fantastic vistas and then it would be just gone. I started thinking about duration and space and I wanted to give a sense of the vastness of the place by creating a video that changed over time and reflected the real, the mundane and the spectacular. There are three kinds of film making processes involved: stop motion*, durational single shots* and photomontage*. I was trying to mirror the pace of my movements, what my eye lingers on….

What is it you hope for the viewer to discover or consider through this work?

As an artist you never know what someone will discover through your work. I guess it is always a hope that they will indeed discover something relevant to them.

I can only speak to what I have considered. The fragility of our planet. How the relationships between the economy and community are complicated, how we are tied together in both support and responsibility. Experiencing art is a personal thing.

What do you find most compelling or enjoyable about this particular work?

I enjoy the optics. The way the video reflects and reacts with the sculpture. Although 30 minutes in length, it offers brief glimpses of our landscape. I made a conscious effort to edit out any shots that had a human presence, because I wanted the viewer to be the human element, and to imagine the little homes as holding human presence.

How does your work connect with broader themes?

I would say my work blends and blurs borders, and draws upon theories of abjection and the sublime, to question commonplace dichotomies. The theme of transition becomes a meditation on the relationship between absence and presence. I am attracted to the idea of a permeable silence becoming part of the work I create, setting up a stage for contemplation, seduction and experience. My immersive art is a fusion between the sculptural work in the space, the world around it, and the experience of the viewer.

When viewing Entangled Community, I felt like you had imbued an almost storybook quality to a very serious message because of the unique materials you used… How has material exploration been a part of your work in general?

My practice involves intensive laboratory-like material investigations. I like finding out how a process works and then corrupting it, and pushing the limits of what a material can do and how it is supposed to be used. When I begin a new project my studio becomes a lab. I like to set up various experiments. I always have an idea of what I want it to do and I keep working until I have the effect I desire.

For this work, I began to engage as I always do in the extreme sport of material investigation. I knew I wanted the globe to act as the screen, I wanted it to have optic effects and resemble shifting tectonic plates but also to seem like a still image of shifting water and ice. Satisfied with my finished compound, I began processing the tiles and experimenting with the limits of the structure to ensure it would be stable but seem fragile. I often use materials that mirror the concepts I am trying to address. The frame of the globe is the steel skeleton of a tent, reformed and welded into the form that blurs between globe and nucleus. The projector I view as part of the sculptural display- as having a conceptual and functional relevancy. Its position acts as an
artificial sun on the planet, but it is also a nod to notions of surveillance.

Admittedly, I am a bit of a hack and don’t always know the “proper” way to process a material, so I just break down and analyze what it is made from and go from there.

What advice do you have to give to new and aspiring artists?

Trust the process, be brave, be kind, be bold.

 

Learn more about…
A Brief history of stop-motion films (Focus Features)
Long Take (Wikipedia)
Montage (Wikipedia)

Artist bio

Kim Vose Jones is a Fredericton-based sculptor and installation artist working primarily in fibre, glass, and construction materials. She holds an MFA in Studio Art from Maine College of Art (Portland). Kim studied glass blowing and casting at Alfred University (Upstate New York) and earned a joint-major BA in Women’s Studies and Religion from Concordia University (Montreal), where she graduated with distinction.

Vose Jones’s immersive art is a fusion between sculptural work in a space, the world around it, and the experience of the viewer, and draws upon theories of abjecton and the sublime to question commonplace dichotomies. She has shown her work internationally and is currently a lecturer of Fine Arts at St. Thomas University in Fredericton.

Learn more about her work at http://kimvosejones.com

About the Exhibition

Writing Topography runs September 26, 2015 through January 10, 2016. The exhibition is organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery and made possible with the generous support of the McCain Family, the Harrison McCain Foundation, and the McCain Foundation. Admission is FREE for Beaverbrook Art Gallery members and for children age six and under. More information on memberships and benefits can be found on our website at http://beaverbrookartgallery.org/en/support/membership.

Featured artists include: Robert Bean, Gerald Beaulieu, Jennifer Bélanger, Rémi Belliveau, Jordan Bennett, Kay Burns, Amanda Dawn Christie, Richard Davis, Leah Garnett, Pam Hall, Mark Igloliorte, Navarana Igloliorte, Ursula Johnson, Philippa Jones, Stephen Kelly, Eleanor King, Fenn Martin, Michael McCormack, Kim Morgan, Nigel Roe, Sara Roth, Anna Torma, Gerald Vaandering, and Kim Vose Jones.

In their words: Conversations with Writing Topography artists — #12: Philippa Jones

Over the next several weeks, we will be posting interviews with artists currently featured in the Gallery’s Writing Topography exhibition. These interviews were conducted by Rebecca Goodine, a university student participating in an internship at the Gallery. These interviews present artists talking about themselves and their work in their own words. Interviews were conducted with the artists by email, and have been lightly edited for grammar and flow (occasionally, questions and responses have been removed). At the end of interviews, we’ve included some links to provide a bit more information about a topic or theme from the interview; these links have been chosen by us, and were not provided by the artists.

Philippa Jones

PJones
Photo: Roger Smith

There are no films of dead birds coming to life that I could use as reference for the animation.

Please tell us a bit about yourself and your artistic practice.

Prior to moving to Canada I completed a BA in Fine Art and an MA in Interactive Art & Design at University College Falmouth. I like to always be making; my practice is diverse and has included and sometimes combines printmaking, painting, pen and ink, animation, art games* and interactive installations. I explore whatever medium feels most apt for my research interests, and I feel like I create the best work when I treat my art like serious play*.

Can you tell us about the process of creating the work in the exhibition?

There are no films of dead birds coming to life that I could use as reference for the animation. To ensure that the movements seemed realistic and flowed smoothly I first created a 3d model of a bird and then a computer animation of the sequence. This gave me the outline of the bird to follow in each hand drawn frame. This ensured that the size and position of the bird remained consistent in addition to the movements flowing from still to still. The details of the bird I had to ‘invent’. So each feather was imagined before I drew it in place. I then scanned in each drawing and compiled each still into the animation. Now that my drawings were digitized I could incorporate the animation with the coded program to make the projected animation responsive. A computer program was created through coding. The program needed to ensure that the Kinect picked up on the human form and ignored all the other information in the room. It also needed to respond to one still person directly in front of it and not moving people in the background.

How does your work connect with broader themes?

It plays with the themes of non linear time. There is an implied past: the death of the bird, the present: a dead bird, and you, as the participant, have power over time and death. You can awaken the bird and set it free of the present death state. Perhaps for you the participant it lives on somewhere out of view, or maybe you just revived it for it to die again and lie waiting for revival from someone else? This reflects our larger relationship to nature and the power we think we have but ultimately do not. I think this work is hopeful and filled with potential possibility, but in the real world dead is dead and this work in contrast to real, final death, reminds us of our immortality and our impact on nature.

As someone who is hugely passionate about video games and how we can explore the medium as artists, I really loved how cleverly you used the Kinect in this piece. Could you maybe talk about some of your work with user participation and interactivity?

There are two tools you can use in video games that can enhance interactive artwork. One is the game itself. Incorporating gaming allows for a more playful dynamic with your participants. People are also much more accepting of a shift in reality and more likely to participate if its’ a game than an art piece. In a gallery space we are often hesitant to play. Art is serious, games are fun.

Technology is just another tool you can utilise in your artwork. Advances in technology allow for more body responsive interaction. The technology I use responds to your intuitive movement whoever you are, however tech savvy you may or may not be. You don’t have to decide to take part, the art starts a dialogue with you; the work responds to your presence, you see the change in the projection, you experiment with your movement, there is a back and fourth between you and the work. Then as in video games, you are rewarded for your invested participation. In this piece ‘Silence,’ you get to see the bird awaken and fly away.

How and why do you explore the themes of “constructed realities”, “active myth making” and the “inquisitive mind” in this piece, and in your work in general?

In my art I aim to create a space into which the participant can project their imagination and to some extent determine their own experience. I am interested in exploring the new parameters in which art can operate, opened through advances in technology. I believe that reality is constantly evolving. We create and reinforce reality’s boundaries. It is my assertion that through art I can shape the sensory experience to distort reality, understand its constraints and potentially subvert it. By subverting reality I hope to foster a sense of the possible for participants and viewers of my work.

What does ‘creativity’ mean to you?

Actively being creative to me means making with imagination and intuition.

What kinds of things do you find helpful as sources of inspiration?

I curiously try to absorb all that interests me and then filter it down to what is most relevant to my current art project. I try to research outside of my area of knowledge. I find Quantum Physics, Natural History and Geology very inspiring. I like to feel like I have to stretch my mind to comprehend a new idea.

What advice do you have to give to new and aspiring artists?

Learn to draw, it allows you to visualize your thoughts and ideas and assists you in all other art practices. I can jump from medium to medium because I trust that my hand will work as a conduit for my ideas. Practice until it is second nature. Also make, let the making lead the ideas, let the art speak for you. Don’t bow to the pressure to constantly explain your art to others. This should be for art critics and writers. You are an artist, you communicate through your art. That is enough.

Learn more about…
Art Games (Artificial.dk)
Serious Play (Photopedagogy.com)

Artist bio

The diverse art practice of Philippa Jones varyingly combines printmaking, painting, pen and ink, animation, art games, and interactive installations. Central to her work is the exploration of constructed realities, active myth-making, and a celebration of wonder and the inquisitive mind.
Jones completed a BFA (2006) and an MFA in Interactive Art & Design (2008) at University College Falmouth in the United Kingdom. Jones has been based in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, since 2009.

About the Exhibition

Writing Topography runs September 26, 2015 through January 10, 2016. The exhibition is organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery and made possible with the generous support of the McCain Family, the Harrison McCain Foundation, and the McCain Foundation. Admission is FREE for Beaverbrook Art Gallery members and for children age six and under. More information on memberships and benefits can be found on our website at http://beaverbrookartgallery.org/en/support/membership.

Featured artists include: Robert Bean, Gerald Beaulieu, Jennifer Bélanger, Rémi Belliveau, Jordan Bennett, Kay Burns, Amanda Dawn Christie, Richard Davis, Leah Garnett, Pam Hall, Mark Igloliorte, Navarana Igloliorte, Ursula Johnson, Philippa Jones, Stephen Kelly, Eleanor King, Fenn Martin, Michael McCormack, Kim Morgan, Nigel Roe, Sara Roth, Anna Torma, Gerald Vaandering, and Kim Vose Jones.

In their words: Conversations with Writing Topography artists — #11: Amanda Dawn Christie

Over the next several weeks, we will be posting interviews with artists currently featured in the Gallery’s Writing Topography exhibition. These interviews were conducted by Rebecca Goodine, a university student participating in an internship at the Gallery. These interviews present artists talking about themselves and their work in their own words. Interviews were conducted with the artists by email, and have been lightly edited for grammar and flow (occasionally, questions and responses have been removed). At the end of interviews, we’ve included some links to provide a bit more information about a topic or theme from the interview; these links have been chosen by us, and were not provided by the artists.

Amanda Dawn Christie

AmandaDawnChristie
Photo: Roger Smith

So often themes of landscape and regional representation are treated on a very superficial level in art history. Landscape and territory is a very complex issue and deserves complex treatment and examination. It’s too easy to take landscape for granted without questioning.

Please tell us a bit about yourself and your artistic practice.

I’m originally from Moncton, NB, but I’ve moved around a lot: from the East Coast, to the West Coast, to Europe and back full circle. As a kid I was always interested in science and as such, various elements of science always find their way into my art projects; be it building radios out copper plumbing, or processing motion picture film in coffee.

I started making experimental films in 1999, and since then, my films have screened around the world and are distributed out of Paris, Toronto, and Amsterdam. Meanwhile, performance art work, contemporary dance, and photography have also always played a major roll in my art practice. More recently my art practice has evolved to include audio work and interactive electronic circuits. While I work across various disciplines, what ties them all together is an interest in the relationship between the human body and analogue technology in a digital age.

Since 1997, I’ve been working with non-profit arts organizations, teaching workshops, publishing articles, and serving on juries. I completed my Master of Fine Arts degree at the SFU School for the Contemporary Arts in Vancouver, BC, before moving to Amsterdam. Upon my return to Canada I worked at the Faucet Media Arts Centre & Struts Gallery where I taught audio and video workshops and helped members with their projects, while teaching part time at Mount Allison University. I later worked as the director of the Galerie Sans Nom and the RE:FLUX festival of sound art and experimental music in Moncton.

I recently left my job at the GSN to work full time as an artist with the support of a new media creation grant from the Canada Council for the Arts — to create a new project called Requiem for Radio. I’m also currently finishing up a 90 minute experimental documentary film called Spectres of Shortwave, about the recently dismantled RCI shortwave radio site.

How would you describe your work in the exhibition?

Radio Towers Like Windchimes” is a part of a larger body or work called “Spectres of Shortwave” which includes a 90 minute documentary film, a radio documentary, and two different art gallery installations.

This particular installation, Spectres of Shortwave: Radio Towers Like Windchimes, involves six 200lb radio towers hanging from the ceiling along with hexaphonic sound* played through six custom built handmade speakers. The sounds that you hear playing from the speakers are drones that I recorded by placing my handmade contact microphones on the RCI radio towers. Several of those towers were over 400 feet tall, and the high winds on the marsh would cause them to vibrate imperceptibly. By placing contact microphones on them, I was able to capture those vibrations and turn them into sound. Each tower had it’s own sound, or it’s own voice filled with complex mixtures of harmonics and subharmonics*. Because I recorded these sounds using microphones I had built myself, it only seemed appropriate to build the speakers that would play the sounds as well.

The “radio towers” hanging from the ceiling are actual artifacts from the RCI shortwave radio site* that once stood on the Tantramar marsh near Sackville, NB. These “towers” hanging in the Beaverbrook Gallery ceiling, were not actually radio towers, but rather they were originally called “spreaders” and they hung hundreds of feet in the air, horizontally spreading the wires and the antennae apart. These spreaders each weigh 200 lbs and are 10 feet long. Hanging them vertically in the gallery and letting them pose as radio towers is a way of reanimating them and giving them a very different life than the one they actually held during their industrial use. The actual RCI radio towers would have been far too large to even get into the gallery, let alone hang from the ceiling, so hanging these spreaders and stand-ins or stunt-doubles for the actual towers is a way of conjuring their memory or their essence.

The Spectres of Shortwave film is a feature length experimental documentary film that was born out of the Marshland Radio Plumbing Project (a project in which I built a radio using copper plumbing and sink instead of electrical wire). This film is a durational landscape film of the radio towers over 4 seasons, and concludes with footage of the demolition of this important site in 2014. There are also two gallery installations that compliment the film. Spectres of Shortwave: Radio Towers Like Windchimes, involves 6 pieces of the radio towers hanging from the ceiling like windchimes, along with hexaphonic sound and artifacts. Spectres of Shortwave: Sine Waves and Snow Falls, presents video loops of radio towers falling in the snow on 3 flatscreens with hexaphonic sound.

Can you tell us about the process of creating the work in the exhibition?

This work was born out of a very long period of research, creation, and hard work. It began with researching the RCI radio towers, their history, the science of how they function, and their role in the community.

Then there was a long period of building up relationships and trust with the people who worked on the site, as well as the government officials in charge of CBC transmissions, and later on with the demolition crew and company that was hired to dismantle the site. Getting permits and permission to be present on the site to shoot film when the site was still an operational high voltage radio transmission site was very difficult, but not nearly as difficult as getting permission to be on site filming during the demolition. This involved a lot of relationship building, as well as very costly insurance.

Once I had the permissions to be on the site, then there was the whole creative and physical labour part of filming and sound recording. I filmed on 35mm motion picture film, and my camera alone weighed over 48 lbs (that’s not including lenses, tripods, or other accessories). Out of 46 days of filming, I had a very small crew of 4 people for 6 of those days; for the rest, I worked alone with a rental van filled with heavy equipment in extreme weather conditions. Over the course of two years, I would go to the RCI site and film the towers in various weather conditions – heavy rain, blizzards, ice storms, lightening storms, sunny days, foggy days, daytime, nighttime, etc. I captured imagery of the site in all four seasons. Then, for a period of several months, I focused on sound recording, and I would hike out to the towers, and clamp my contact microphones onto them in order to capture the sounds of their vibrations. I managed to gather dozens of hours of audio recordings, which included the sound of each tower, its base, its beams, its ladder, and the accompanying halyard wires.

During one of my audio recording expeditions, I asked if I could have these six spreaders (the “radio towers” you now see hanging from the ceiling). Normally the answer would have been “no” as the entire site was slated to be sold for scrap metal. However, thanks to four years worth of building relationships with the staff and with government officials, I was able to take these 6 artifacts. At that same time I got permission to climb two of the towers, once I passed a climbing certification exam and bought even more insurance.

During the demolition of the site, as the towers fell, the red beacon lights that once lit up the sky at night, came crashing to the ground, and when the demolition crew took their lunch breaks, I would scamper out in the field to the recently fallen towers and collect as much of the broken red glass as I could.

A major part of this installation is about reanimating these unique historic artifacts, to give a sense of life and reverence to the history of that site. The other component of this installation is the science of sound, and how contact microphones can make imperceptible sounds audible. I also faced the challenge of handmade speaker construction and learning the science and mathematics of volume calculation and cylindrical boxed speaker construction for Q. The final challenge was situating the speakers appropriately for the unique acoustics of that gallery space. Fine tuning in the placement and volume adjustments for each speaker had to do with finding the exact positioning and volume levels so that when you are in the centre of the space, all six speaker sounds blend to form one single sound, but when you stand under or next to each speaker its sound is isolated and stands out from the rest. This was a difficult challenge given the cavernous acoustics of the space, but after much work and fine tuning, it was achieved.

What was the inspiration for this work?

I have been developing various projects related to the RCI shortwave towers over the past 7 years, that are driven by an interest in our personal relationship to invisible landscapes. Instead of focusing on the transmitted messages, I am interested in the idea of our bodies as unintentional witnesses. I am also exploring the politics of communication infrastructures and how the destruction of so-called obsolete technologies is placing us in more vulnerable situations in terms of access to information, government censorship, and dependence on digital technologies.

What is it you hope for the viewer to discover or consider through this work?

I try not to place expectations on the viewer’s interpretation of my work. As an artist, I do a lot of research and work on the project, and therefore I have a very close and specific interpretation of the work, but even so, my interpretation of my own artwork is still only one interpretation. I fully expect that other people will have different interpretations and experiences of my work than I do, and those are equally as valid as my own. I do not seek to impose a “message” or “intended reading” on the viewer.

My only hope is that each viewer comes to the work with an open mind, ready to experience the work, and to bring their own particular and personal experiences and understandings to their reading of the work. My hope is simply that they will spend enough time with it, to form a reaction or relationship to it.

What do you find most compelling or enjoyable about this particular work?

I don’t know that art work is necessarily supposed to be “enjoyable.” I think it can be enjoyable, but it can also be more than that. Making something “enjoyable” is not my goal as an artist.

What I find most compelling about this work is the contrast between the delicate beauty of the hanging windchimes, and the sense of imminent industrial danger. The hanging towers and their shadows are beautiful and they appear to be weightless, as if they are spectres rising from their graves. And yet, in spite of being perfectly safe, there is an air of danger when one sees such heavy industrial objects hanging from a single piece of aircraft cable. What I like is the sense of uncertainty and unease that this creates. Unease is an appropriate feeling to have in relation to the RCI site, because in demolishing this site, many people in remote areas with no access to digital technology lost access to information. So while the towers were once beautiful landmarks on the marsh, they were also an extremely important industrial site for high voltage short wave radio transmissions – they played a very important role in international communications, and now they are gone, and this is a very real loss for certain communities around the world.

How does your work connect with broader themes?

My work about the RCI towers engages directly with broader themes of international communications but also with themes of landscape and regional identity. The towers were an important local landmark for people living in the NB region, but they also played an important role in international communication technology.

This work also connects with the broader theme of analogue technology in a digital age and the fiction of obsolete technologies. We live in a digital age, where the idea is that “newer is better” and we are always upgrading everything, from computers to operating systems, to cell phones, and beyond. There is a misconception that older technologies are not as good as the newer ones. Yet ironically, many older technologies that we now consider as obsolete, are actually much more reliable and future proof than current technologies. Take for example film cameras that are made of metal and completely mechanical – they don’t need system upgrades and they are much more sturdy. Think of all the places where you can’t access WiFi or get cell phone reception – shortwave radio can always get through to those places, and a short wave radio site is much less vulnerable to interference or destruction than a satellite in orbit.

This work also engages with broader themes of the human body and wireless technology. We live in an age where the invisible architectures of radio waves are passing through our bodies all the time. WiFi, Bluetooth, and cell phone signals all travel on radio waves (this is why analogue television broadcasts were stopped in 2011, to add more radio wave bandwidth for cell phones). This information on these radio waves is passing through our bodies all the time. Right now, someone is having a cell phone conversation passing through your body, and someone is doing their online banking through your body. We can’t see these things, but they are there, and they are passing through us all the time.

What are your larger thoughts on the themes of the Writing Topography exhibit, and how it relates to your piece?

I’m very excited to see the themes of Writing Topography being explored at an institution like the Beaverbrook Art Gallery. So often themes of landscape and regional representation are treated on a very superficial level in art history. Landscape and territory is a very complex issue and deserves complex treatment and examination. It’s too easy to take landscape for granted without questioning.

My work engages heavily with ideas of landscape, regional identity, the body and communications. It looks at the invisible architectures of radio waves that travel through the landscape and through our bodies, as well as the visible architecture of international communication infrastructure in the landscape. I work with the manifestation of technology as architecture in the landscape, and how it relates to both the individuals living in the region, as well as the people living in other countries around the world who once listened to the broadcasts from this site.

Can you further discuss some of your work and interest in radio and radio towers?

Much of my work since 2008 has revolved around radio waves. I wouldn’t say that it is about radio towers so much as about radio waves. In the case of the RCI site, those towers were just support for the antennas. The antennas were the wires that were strung horizontally between the towers, not the towers themselves. The towers are the striking landmark, but they were merely the supports for the antennas that transmitted the radio waves.

My works exploring these themes include the Marshland Radio Plumbing Project, where I built a radio using copper plumbing instead of electronics, in an attempt to recreate the rusty bolt effect through which some Sackville residents heard the radio in their household appliances. I also have a photography series called “Industrial Domestic #2: Laundry Line Antenna” in which I documented a laundry line near the RCI radio towers for a year in reference to stories of families who heard the radio on their clothesline in that area. I also created an expanded cinema performance for dual 16mm film projectors and radio called “Transmissions” which is a more poetic look at the general phenomenon of our bodies as sites and unintentional witnesses of these electromagnetic topographies. Finally, there is the Spectres of Shortwave film and suite of installations, as well as Requiem for Radio which is a new body of work that I am developing in which I will be building 13 Theremins, one for each of the RCI radio towers, that will trigger audio and image recordings of the towers in order to conjure the ghosts of the radio towers with radio waves.

What is it about this technology that interests you?

As far as radio waves are concerned, I am interested in the complex network of invisible activity passing through us and around us all the time, carrying information. Not just traditional AM and FM radio waves, but also Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, satellite, and cell phone signals all travel on radio waves.

How does this piece relate to your other work in film?

This piece was actually born out of the production of my most recent film, “Spectres of Shortwave”, which is a 90 minute experimental documentary about the RCI radio towers. The process of making that film is what enabled me access to the RCI site to gather the audio recordings as well as the physical artifacts of the towers, the vertical stays, and broken red glass. The Radio Towers Like Windchimes installation, as well as the Sine Waves Like Snow Falls installation, are both intended to be compliments to the Spectres of Shortwave film, offering different points of entry, exploration, and ways in to the subject and the history of this site. My approach to filmmaking, like my approach to art making, is an open approach where I do not seek to tell people what to think, but rather to present them with images, audio, and artifacts for their consideration. I prefer to place film viewers and gallery goers, not in the seat of the student, but rather, in the seat of the witness or the observer.

What does ‘creativity’ mean to you?

Creativity can be born out of destruction. Sometimes it helps to break things apart into their basic component pieces before building them back up again, in order to look at them in a new way. Doing so, not only helps us to understand the nature of our subject and our materials, but also the nature of destruction and creation itself, two powerful forces present in the everyday world around us.

What kinds of things do you find helpful as sources of inspiration?

A lot of my inspiration comes from being present in the world. Taking walks, looking around me, reading the news, reading books, and interacting with people. Just the act of living and being present is a source of inspiration.

What advice do you have to give to new and aspiring artists?

Don’t rely on inspiration. Muse is a myth. Art work is work. Art work is hard work. Often times, you have to keep working even if you don’t feel inspired or motivated. If you are onto a good idea that means something to you, and that you think means something to society or the world beyond you, if you’re on to something that you believe in and that you care about, keep working at it. Keep pushing at the edges from different sides. Look at it from different angles. Break it apart. Build it back up again. Repeat. Don’t just do one little exploration and move on to something else. The world needs more depth, and depth takes time and hard work. Be prepared to keep working even when you don’t feel like it, and trust that your energy and your motivation will eventually return, because it will. Just don’t give up. You also need to know when to step away, and go take a walk and look at something else for a while.

Learn more about…
Pickup (Wikipedia)
Subharmonic (Wikipedia)
RCI Ends Shortwave Broadcast (CBC.ca)

Artist bio

Amanda Dawn Christie’s experimental films have screened nationally and internationally at numerous festivals and cinematheques. Her solo screening, Dividing Roadmaps by Timezones: 10 years of moving pictures 1999–2009 has screened at the Canadian Film Institute (Ottawa), the Winnipeg Film Group’s Cinematheque, the Vogue Cinema (Sackville), and the Halifax Independent Filmmakers Festival.

Christie completed her MFA at Simon Fraser University School for the Contemporary Arts in Vancouver. She worked as production supervisor at the Struts Gallery & Faucet Media Arts Centre in Sackville, New Brunswick, and then as the director of the Galerie Sans Nom in Moncton, New Brunswick, and as the director of the re:flux Festival of experimental music and sound art in Moncton. She is also a founding member of the IRiSs Laboratories research and performance collective.

About the Exhibition

Writing Topography runs September 26, 2015 through January 10, 2016. The exhibition is organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery and made possible with the generous support of the McCain Family, the Harrison McCain Foundation, and the McCain Foundation. Admission is FREE for Beaverbrook Art Gallery members and for children age six and under. More information on memberships and benefits can be found on our website at http://beaverbrookartgallery.org/en/support/membership.

Featured artists include: Robert Bean, Gerald Beaulieu, Jennifer Bélanger, Rémi Belliveau, Jordan Bennett, Kay Burns, Amanda Dawn Christie, Richard Davis, Leah Garnett, Pam Hall, Mark Igloliorte, Navarana Igloliorte, Ursula Johnson, Philippa Jones, Stephen Kelly, Eleanor King, Fenn Martin, Michael McCormack, Kim Morgan, Nigel Roe, Sara Roth, Anna Torma, Gerald Vaandering, and Kim Vose Jones.

In their words: Conversations with Writing Topography artists — #10: Kim Morgan

Over the next several weeks, we will be posting interviews with artists currently featured in the Gallery’s Writing Topography exhibition. These interviews were conducted by Rebecca Goodine, a university student participating in an internship at the Gallery. These interviews present artists talking about themselves and their work in their own words. Interviews were conducted with the artists by email, and have been lightly edited for grammar and flow (occasionally, questions and responses have been removed). At the end of interviews, we’ve included some links to provide a bit more information about a topic or theme from the interview; these links have been chosen by us, and were not provided by the artists.

Kim Morgan

KimMorgan

Photo: Roger Smith

[…] you can map the history of the range light visually and physically; you can see the wear and tear of the original structure, the vandalism, the graffiti, the rotting wood, the peeling paint, the bullet holes, the smell of the tarred roof. It is a complete sensual experience – at times repulsive.

Please tell us a bit about yourself and your artistic practice.

I’m a visual artist working in sculpture installation and extended media*. For the last ten years I have been exploring the process of cross-disciplinary collaborations through the creation of public art projects in partnership with scientists, engineers and other artists. Within this framework, my work addresses the impact of technology on the human body, our perceptions of time and space, and the shifting boundaries between the private and the public.

I was born and raised in Regina, Saskatchewan. Currently I live in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where I am an Associate Professor at NSCAD University, teaching sculpture, installation and public art. I received a B.A. in Literature from McGill University, a BFA in Sculpture/Extended Media from the School of Visual Arts in NYC, and an MFA in Installation, from the University of Regina. My work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and has received numerous awards. Range Light Borden-Carleton PEI won the Nova Scotia Masterworks Award 2012, and was included in the Oh Canada exhibition at Mass MoCA, USA.

How would you describe your work in the exhibition?

It is a site-responsive sculpture/installation which is reconfigured each time it is installed in a different location. It is a new type of memorial.

Can you tell us about the process of creating the work in the exhibition?

It’s a latex rubber imprint/cast of the interior and exterior of a de-commissioned range light from the town of Borden-Carleton, Prince Edward Island. It was cast on location with the help of a crew. There are seven layers of latex rubber with one layer of mosquito netting in the middle. It took 3-4 weeks to cast and 100 gallons of liquid rubber latex.*

What was the inspiration for this work?

I’m from Saskatchewan where the majority of the wooden grain elevators have been torn down or replaced by cement silos. These elevators were landmarks for the numerous townships and travelers across the prairies. Of course they had a practical function storing grain for transportation and exportation, but the elevators were also symbolic icons for a rural way of life when Saskatchewan was proudly known as the “breadbasket of the world.” In consequence of technology, globalization and urbanization, this way of life is rare now and many of towns, like the elevators, have disappeared. When I moved to Nova Scotia in 2008, I found a similar situation happening with the lighthouses and the communities in which they were situated. For me it was an easy shift from abandoned grain elevators to the de-commissioning of the lighthouses in my new home.

What was the development process like from your initial idea to the finished work?

The work is very process oriented and very labor intensive. As a site-responsive work it continues to be so.

What is it you hope for the viewer to discover or consider through this work?

I hope the work speaks for itself. The title is an epitaph. There is pathos about this piece that even if you’re not connected to this particular structure or place it leaves space for contemplating the things that give meaning to our lives and mark the interior/exterior of our experiences.

How does your work connect with broader themes?

It connects to the broader themes of identity, community, technology, memory, and desire. And of course our relationship to change. How inevitable change is in our lives and how uncomfortable it can be.

You write that with Range Light, Borden-Carleton PEI 2010 you “have created a cultural artifact out of a dead monument.” How does this work relate to your broader interest in examining themes of perception, time and space?

I interpret the Writing Topography exhibition, as explorations of mapping and its various manifestations. I am interested in mapping experiences, how they shift, fold in time and space, and how this informs us. I started casting architecture in 2001 during my graduate studies in Saskatchewan. Along with my studio work I was reading about phenomenology, Henri Lefebvre’s The Production of Space and Gilles Deleuze’s ideas about “the fold.” These writings influenced my work and still do. I cast the interior of the doctor’s residence at the Fort Qu’Appelle Sanatorium. It was also abandoned derelict and haunted. In addition, I cast a nurse’s dorm room at the Weyburn Mental Hospital. It too was haunted. Both institutions had been revered for innovative (and controversial) medical research. Now the residue of controversial and abusive practices has lead to the dismantling and rejection of both intuitions. With these earlier works I was experimenting with latex rubber, capturing architectural details and elements, plus the energies within the walls. I took these maps/skins and reconfigured them in different locations changing the configuration according to the space but always keeping the indexical quality of the original structure. These skins became new entities but were still marked by the past.

On viewing my work in the Writing Topography exhibition, you can map the history of the range light visually and physically; you can see the wear and tear of the original structure, the vandalism, the graffiti, the rotting wood, the peeling paint, the bullet holes, the smell of the tarred roof. It is a complete sensual experience – at times repulsive. With the range light, I was finally able to cast a complete building, both inside and out. For me this work is complete formally, with the potential for endless configurations and folds, responsive to both the viewer and to the installation site. It becomes its own entity. Here the mapping and tracing is a way of knowing and positioning ourselves in the world, whether we map the lines on someone’s face or the cracks on a sidewalk through movement. Surfaces are just points of departure. The inside and outside are never detached from each other – joined by a membrane, a skin, porous and mutable. They work together, informing each other. We know the inside from the outside and we know the outside from the inside. The range light is not just a lighthouse, just like a grain elevator is not just an elevator.

What is it about installation and sculpture art that appeals to you as a creative medium?

I’m interested in spatial relationships, material and form. And it is physical.

What does ‘creativity’ mean to you?

The ability to see beyond the obvious and to think, act and produce outside of “the box.”

What kinds of things do you find helpful as sources of inspiration?

Everything can be inspirational depending on the context – and my state of mind.

What advice do you have to give to new and aspiring artists?

“No Surrender!!!”

 

Learn more about…
Extended Media art (YouTube/Lafayette College)

Kim Morgan – Range Light, Borden-Carleton, PEI (John Michael Kohler Arts Center)

Artist bio

Kim Morgan was born and raised in Saskatchewan. She received a BA in literature from McGill University (1988); a BFA in sculpture/installation from the School of Visual Arts, (New York City, 1992); and an MFA from the University of Regina (2004). She is an assistant professor teaching sculpture, installation, and public art at NSCAD University in Halifax, and a researcher at Cineflux, NSCAD University, a centre for interdisciplinary research in emerging cinema and media arts.

From 2005 to 2008, Morgan was the artist in residence for TRLabs (now TRTech), Regina, a tech research non-profit, where she collaborated with scientists and engineers to create interactive public artworks such as Data s p a c e d.

Her work has been exhibited in Canada, New York, and Europe. Range Light, Borden-Carleton 2010 was included in the 2013 Oh, Canada exhibition at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art. Morgan is currently working on Tracing the City, Exploring the Private Experience of Public Art through Art and Anthropology, an interdisciplinary research project involving cinema, urban anthropology, and visual art funded by a SSHRC Research-Creation Grant.

About the Exhibition

Writing Topography runs September 26, 2015 through January 10, 2016. The exhibition is organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery and made possible with the generous support of the McCain Family, the Harrison McCain Foundation, and the McCain Foundation. Admission is FREE for Beaverbrook Art Gallery members and for children age six and under. More information on memberships and benefits can be found on our website at http://beaverbrookartgallery.org/en/support/membership.

Featured artists include: Robert Bean, Gerald Beaulieu, Jennifer Bélanger, Rémi Belliveau, Jordan Bennett, Kay Burns, Amanda Dawn Christie, Richard Davis, Leah Garnett, Pam Hall, Mark Igloliorte, Navarana Igloliorte, Ursula Johnson, Philippa Jones, Stephen Kelly, Eleanor King, Fenn Martin, Michael McCormack, Kim Morgan, Nigel Roe, Sara Roth, Anna Torma, Gerald Vaandering, and Kim Vose Jones.

Upcoming Events: November 20th, 2015 edition | Évènements courants du 20 novembre, 2015

Current Exhibitions:

Writing Topography: The Marion McCain Exhibition of Contemporary Atlantic Art
September 26, 2015 – January 10, 2016
Curator: Corinna Ghaznavi
Organized by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery and made possible with the generous support of the McCain Family, the Harrison McCain Foundation, and The McCain Foundation.

Masterworks Now! Celebrating New Acquisitions of Historical, Modern and Contemporary art
September 26 – November 1, 2015
Curator: Jeffrey Spalding, Senior Curator
Organised by the Beaverbrook Art Gallery with the support of the City of Fredericton and the Government of New Brunswick.

THE KINGSTON PRIZE: The sixth national biennial portrait competition
November 14 – January 17
The Kingston Prize is supported by the W. Garfield Weston Foundation.

If you are looking for a particular work or exhibition, please feel free to contact us to find out if it is on display!

Opening hours: Gallery now closed on Mondays

We have moved into our Fall-Spring schedule, and are now closed to the public on Mondays. Our offices remain open Mondays (holidays excepted).

Important construction updates:

Our building project is underway – big things are coming, but small disruptions are necessary.

Learn more about:

After school program: We currently have a few spots open for the current school year, starting in September! More information here, or contact Liliana at 458-0973. ]

Francophone docents: The Gallery has launched a francophone docents program, supported by Manulife. Are you interested in helping us offer tours in French? Read more about it here.

Family Art Classes SECOND & LAST Sunday of each month between 2 – 4 pm Families create wonderful memories and art together during these two hour sessions using a variety of mediums. Instructor Sandy Brewer’s classes are fun and relaxed, open to adults and children ages 5 and up, and all materials are provided.

FREE for members with a Family membership (including Family Curator’s Circle and Family Director’s Circle), $5 per person or $15 for a family of 4.

Part of the C. Elizabeth Baker Learning and Creating Series

Thursday Night Art Classes Happen most Thursdays at 7:00 PM – Contact us for details!

Part of the C. Elizabeth Baker Learning and Creating Series

Art for Tots is offered most Fridays at 10:00 am. These short workshops are weekly but casual (so you won’t miss a crucial part if you miss a week), and are geared for the very young accompanied by a parent.

The only cost is an adult admission (so it’s FREE for members, and $10 per week for non-members).

Materials are included. Please feel free to contact us to confirm that it is happening on a given week.

Part of the C. Elizabeth Baker Learning and Creating Series.

Beaverbrook_Campaign_Logo2012_BILExpositions Courantes :

Créer la topographie: L’Exposition Marion McCain d’art contemporain de la région atlantique
Du 26 septembre 2015 au 10 janvier 2016
Conservatrice : Corinna Ghaznavi,
Organisée par la Galerie d’art Beaverbrook et rendue possible grâce au généreux soutien de la Fondation Harrison McCain, La Fondation McCain, et membres de la famille McCain.

Les Chefs-d’œuvre d’aujourd’hui! Nouvelle acquisition d’œuvres anciennes, modernes et contemporaines
Du 26 septembre, 2015 au 1er novembre, 2015
Conservateur: Jeffrey Spalding, Conservateur principal
Organisée par la Galerie d’art Beaverbrook avec l’appui de la Ville de Fredericton et le Gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick

LE PRIX KINGSTON: Le sixième concours biennale du portrait canadien
du 14 novembre au 17 janvier
Le Prix Kingston est appuyé par la Fondation W. Garfield Weston.

Heures d’ouverture: La Galerie est maintenant fermée les lundis.

Nous avons maintenant commencé notre horaire automne-printemps; la Galerie est maintenant fermée au public les lundis.

Nos bureaux restent ouverts les lundis (avec l’exception des jours fériés).

Mises-à-jour de construction importantes

Notre édifice grandit – des grandes choses arrivent, mais des petites difficultés sont nécessaires. Apprenez-en plus sur :

Programme après-école : Nous avons couramment quelques places dans le programme pour l’année scolaire courante, commençant en septembre! Plus d’infos ici, ou contactez Liliana aujourd’hui au 458-0973.

Guides bénévoles francophones La galerie d’art Beaverbrook cherche des guides bénévoles francophones pour favoriser la vie culturelle dans notre communauté. Si vous aimez l’art et le contact avec le public, vous êtes les bienvenus à partager votre générosité comme bénévoles.

Est-ce que ça vous intéresse? Si oui, suivez ce lien pour plus d’informations.

Les cours d’art des jeudis soirs : Ont lieu la plupart des jeudis soir à 19h. Contactez-nous pour plus d’infos! (Cours offerts en anglais.)

Une partie de la Série apprendre et créer C. Elizabeth Baker

Ateliers artistiques pour toute la famille Ces ateliers sont offerts le deuxième et le dernier dimanche du mois, de 14 h à 16h. Tous les matériaux sont fournis. Ce programme est offert uniquement en anglais.

Les frais sont de 5 $ par personne ou 15 $ pour une famille de quatre personnes.Gratuit pour les membres avec adhésion familiale, y inclus les adhésions Cercle du Conservateur (Famille) et Cercle du Directeur (Famille).

Une partie de la Série apprendre et créer C. Elizabeth Baker

Atelier d’art pour les tout-petits Les vendredis de 10h à 11h Les enfants âgés de 2 à 4 ans et leurs parents sont invités à participer aux jeux artistiques, aux visites de la Galerie, aux activités artistiques pratiques and aux contes. Nous vous demandons de vous inscrire par téléphone au 506.458.2028.

Frais : Aucun coût pour les petits; l’adulte qui accompagne l’enfant paie les frais réguliers d’entrée. GRATUIT pour les membres.

Ce programme est offert uniquement en anglais.

Une partie de la Série apprendre et créer C. Elizabeth Baker.